WILL RUSSIA SERVE THE OLD WINE IN A NEW BOTTLE?

ANZHELA AMIRJANYAN
Graduate, International relations, YEREVAN




 

Nowadays, one of the main features of global political developments are non-violent or color revolutions. These revolutions are brought about by wide-spread corruption, poverty, unemployment and a deep gap between masses and the ruling elite with the latter being the biggest political risk for the ruling party. Most analysts argue that these factors are combined also with outside support, which can culminate in the revolution.  However, what happened in Armenia after a few weeks of peaceful demonstrations, the Velvet revolution, that brought down the regime and has exercised true people power, is considered to be unprecedented for it didn’t owe its origin to the external assistance or wasn’t an attempt by ‘‘US to export democracy’’ in Armenia. The geopolitical factor was initially excluded.  However, Russia has traditionally had negative attitude towards color revolutions and has seen them ‘‘as a new US and European approach to warfare that focuses on creating destabilizing revolutions in other states as a means of serving their security interests at low cost and with minimal casualties’’[i], which means that Russia, desperate to maintain its own standing in the Caucasus, was likely to intervene in the events unfolding in Armenia. However, the Kremlin didn’t view turmoil in Armenia as a Ukraine-style revolution. Asked if Russia would intervene, Kremlin Spokesman Dmitry Peskov said the matter was "exclusively an internal affair" and Russian action would be "absolutely inappropriate". Moreover, after Armenia’s unpopular leader Serzh Sargsyan’s resignation, Russian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova called Armenians “a great people” and wrote, “Armenia, Russia is always with you!” 

The prospect of a Russian intervention was low for 2 key reasons.

One of the possible reasons behind Russian inaction was that Moscow didn’t regard the revolution in Armenia as a threat to its geopolitical prerogatives, but rather as an opportunity to make a strategic move through a global panic over Russia's continued warlike behavior. Satisfied that this is genuinely an internal Armenian issue directed at an incompetent and ineffective government, Russia’s proved with its muted response to Armenia’s color revolution that Kremlin embraces the policy of non-interventionism.

Secondly, a rapid spread of pro-Western sentiment among local journalists, civil society representatives and youth was prevalent in Armenia in the past decade. This process only accelerated after Armenian President Serzh Sargsyan unexpectedly decided in 2013 to join Russian-led Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) over EU Association Agreement. Yerevan’s decision of September 3, 2013 to involve in Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU) was mostly conditioned by Moscow’s ultimatum imposition, which left a deep track in the perception of Armenia-Russia relations and formed a comparatively new cliché[ii]. Anti-Russian sentiments were on rise in Armenia in recent years due to major levers of influence that Russia maintained over Armenia: Armenia’s corrupt oligarchic system and the military threat coming from Azerbaijan. Civil society and the opposition in Armenia viewed Russia as the sponsor of the autocratic, oligarchic system of governance in Armenia. They have traditionally criticized the government for having closest ties with the country which provides 85 percent of arms export[iii] to Azerbaijan-a country which is in continuous conflict with Armenia over the disputed territory of Nagorno Karabakh.  This anti-Russian sentiment reached its apex in 2016 when the intense fighting broke out in Karabagh known as Four-Day War. This drew the public attention to the Russian-supplied arms which played a role in the deaths of dozens of soldiers.

Both opposition leaders and civil society members demanded not only Armenia's exit from the EAEU, but also an end to the Russian military presence in the country. The anti-Russian rhetoric was useful for both the Armenian government and the opposition to alert Russia not to take Armenia for granted. So, in one way the April Revolution in Armenia was a test for Russian-Armenian relations, and Russia viewed it as a new impulse for mutually beneficial relations aimed at restoring the damage of Russia's protective image among Armenians. Needless to say, Armenia is important to Russia, as losing Armenia would cause fundamental changes in Moscow’s influence in the South Caucasus. Furthermore, Armenia can’t cherry-pick among its closest allies because its landlocked position limits the freedom to maneuver in its foreign policy, and Armenia’s economic and defense imperatives dictate a close alignment with Russia. This was reaffirmed by new prime minister and protest leader of Armenia, Nikol Pashinian, who not only supported maintaining the current Russian-Armenian relationship but also suggested a “new impulse” for political and trade relations[iv] during the meeting with Russian president Vladimir Putin in Sochi on May 14. During another meeting a month later, Armenian PM expressed his hope that ‘’the relations will develop more effectively on the basis of mutual respect for the best interest and sovereignty of the two States’’[v]

On the whole, Armenia will continue to pursue its “Complementarian” or multi-vector foreign policy, which means that no radical change in the realm of foreign policy is expected to take place.  Yet there is no strong anti-Russian current in Armenian political and society rhetoric. The recent civic movement was significant in realizing the potential of Russian-Armenian mutual relations for economic development and security. Undeniably, Russia should adopt new approaches towards Armenia and it should realize that under new circumstances the backward-looking policies are destined to be counter-productive. In Armenia people hope that Kremlin wouldn’t serve the old wine in a new bottle.

SOURCES

  • Pashinyan and Putin hold first meeting, pledge to build closer ties, Joshua Kucera May 14, 2018

see at; https://eurasianet.org/s/pashinyan-and-putin-hold-first-meeting-pledge-to-build-closer-ties

  • Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan is away to the Russian Federation on a working visit, 13June, 2018

see at; http://www.primeminister.am/en/foreign-visits/item/2018/06/13/Nikol-Pashinyan-Visit-to-Russia/

  • Report: Azerbaijan Gets 85 Percent Of Its Weapons From Russia, Joshua Kucera Mar 17, 2015

see at;  https://eurasianet.org/node/72581

  • Russia and the “Color Revolution”, Centre for Strategic and International Studies, May 28, 2014

see at; https://www.csis.org/analysis/russia-and-%E2%80%9Ccolor-revolution%E2%80%9D

  • Urgent need for Armenia-Russia relations inventory, June 22, 2018

see at; https://independent.am/blog/2018/06/22/urgent-need-for-armenia-russia-relations-inventory/

  • Why Armenia’s Military Alliance With Russia Is Not At Risk, November 07, 2015

see at; https://www.rferl.org/a/caucasus-report-armenian-russia-military-alliance/27351046.html

 

 


[i] Russia and the “Color Revolution”, Centre for Strategic and International Studies, May 28, 2014

see at https://www.csis.org/analysis/russia-and-%E2%80%9Ccolor-revolution%E2%80%9D

[ii] Urgent need for Armenia-Russia relations inventory, June 22, 2018

see at https://independent.am/blog/2018/06/22/urgent-need-for-armenia-russia-relations-inventory/

[iii] Report: Azerbaijan Gets 85 Percent Of Its Weapons From Russia, Joshua Kucera Mar 17, 2015

See at https://eurasianet.org/node/72581

[iv] Pashinyan and Putin hold first meeting, pledge to build closer ties, Joshua Kucera May 14, 2018

See at https://eurasianet.org/s/pashinyan-and-putin-hold-first-meeting-pledge-to-build-closer-ties

[v] Prime Minister Nikol Pashinyan is away to the Russian Federation on a working visit, 13June, 2018

See at http://www.primeminister.am/en/foreign-visits/item/2018/06/13/Nikol-Pashinyan-Visit-to-Russia/

ANZHELA AMIRJANYAN
1542 reads | 07.07.2018
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